Social Media Naturals

Yes, some people just “get” social media.

Cover photo: @jerrysilfwer

Talented social media nat­ur­als are rare to find.

This art­icle will explain the concept of social media nat­ur­als and why they could be an asset to your business.

As a digit­al strategist, I can often tell wheth­er someone work­ing at a com­pany “gets” social media. In my exper­i­ence, hav­ing a social media nat­ur­al in charge of your brand accounts is more efficient.

How do you recog­nise a social media natural?

Here goes:

Social Media is Easy (For Some)

Having done my fair share of media train­ing, I’ve learnt that most people have their pre­ferred means of communication. 

  • Some people are stel­lar on a big stage in front of many others.
  • Some people are the most com­fort­able in smal­ler groups as networkers.
  • Some people can get any­thing to hap­pen by just pick­ing up the phone.
  • Some people are at their best in a one-to-one conversation.
  • And some people find it easy to com­mu­nic­ate via social media. 1Perhaps “social media” isn’t the best name. Because why should­n’t a tele­phone be con­sidered a medi­um for dir­ect social inter­ac­tion? Early on, social media used to encom­pass search engines, blogs, … Continue read­ing

In many ways, social media has opened up a whole new array of human com­mu­nic­a­tion forms, thus increas­ing the chances for each of us to find a par­tic­u­lar style of com­mu­nic­a­tion that suits our personality.

Social Media Naturals: Definition

Social Media Naturals

Here’s how to define social media naturals:

Social Media Natural = someone for whom it’s intu­it­ive and effort­less to com­mu­nic­ate via social networks.

Please note: Social media nat­ur­als are not syn­onym­ous with influ­en­cers (i.e. digit­al per­son­al­it­ies with online audi­ences). Influencers are often also social media nat­ur­als, but not all social media nat­ur­als are influencers.

Learn more: Social Media Naturals

💡 Subscribe and get a free ebook on how to get bet­ter PR ideas.

Sure, most online influ­en­cers are also social media nat­ur­als — but not all of them. Influencers are influ­en­tial online because of their cap­ab­il­ity for social inter­ac­tion and their abil­ity to attract and enter­tain an audi­ence.

Social media nat­ur­als don’t need large fol­low­ings; they use social net­works to con­nect deeply with oth­er like-minded people around their pas­sions and interests. 

Read also: The Influencers in Public Relations

Why Social Media Naturals are Valuable

In future gen­er­a­tions, almost every­one will be a social media nat­ur­al. But until then, organ­isa­tions will have to find — and hire! — them.

Hiring a social media influ­en­cer to execute the digit­al strategy can be a hit-or-miss enter­prise. I’ve seen this sev­er­al times from a close-up perspective. 

Influencers tend to care mostly about their brands; for them, it’s always about pos­i­tion­ing them­selves in the mar­ket­place. However, a niched social media nat­ur­al can find an organ­isa­tion with match­ing passions.

Identifying social media nat­ur­als with­in an organ­isa­tion is often more straight­for­ward than one might think. This is because they can­’t stop con­stantly inter­act­ing on social media with the top­ic of their interest. 

Many organ­isa­tions have experts who are already using social media to dis­cuss and con­nect, but no one might have invited them to con­trib­ute pro­fes­sion­ally to the organ­isa­tion’s social media strategy.

How To Empower Social Media Naturals

When look­ing for a com­munity man­ager, I always invest­ig­ate their per­son­al social media presence. 

I’d look not for massive fol­low­ings but for the ease of use, pas­sion, and will­ing­ness to exper­i­ment. I’d look spe­cific­ally for someone with no prob­lems find­ing the right ton­al­ity for vari­ous social media situations.

Once with­in the organ­isa­tion, I’d sug­gest cre­at­ing a frame­work well-suited for social media naturals:

  • A shared vis­ion and dir­ec­tion. A social media nat­ur­al isn’t neces­sar­ily a stra­tegic geni­us; they often need detailed roadmaps of their expectations.
  • A shared idea of what con­sti­tutes suc­cess. While a social media nat­ur­al might suc­cess­fully cater to a brand audi­ence, he or she needs meas­ur­able objectives.
  • A shared under­stand­ing of cre­at­ive free­dom. A social media nat­ur­al must be allowed to deploy their tal­ents; micro-man­aging them will defeat their pro­fes­sion­al purpose.

Please sup­port my PR blog by shar­ing it with oth­er com­mu­nic­a­tion pro­fes­sion­als. For ques­tions or PR sup­port, con­tact me via jerry@​spinfactory.​com.

PR Resource: Why We Share on Social Media

Spin Academy | Online PR Courses

Why We Share on Social Media

People want to be loved; fail­ing that admired; fail­ing that feared; fail­ing that hated and des­pised. They want to evoke some sort of sen­ti­ment. The soul shud­ders before obli­vi­on and seeks con­nec­tion at any price.”
— Hjalmar Söderberg (1869−1941), Swedish author

When we share on social media, we share for a reas­on. And that reas­on typ­ic­ally has some­thing to do with ourselves:

  • We share to make ourselves look smart.
  • We share to fit in and to stand out.
  • We share to express individuality.
  • We share to belong to our in-group.
  • We share to be loved.
  • We share to pro­voke reac­tions for atten­tion.
  • We share to extract sympathy.
  • We share to make us feel bet­ter about ourselves.
  • We share to get ahead.
  • We share to grow an audience.
  • We share to com­pensate for our shortcomings.
  • We share to get the respect we need.

If you can get social media to work for you, great. But you should also be mind­ful not to let the pres­sure get the bet­ter of you.

A status update with no likes (or a clev­er tweet without retweets) becomes the equi­val­ent of a joke met with silence. It must be rethought and rewrit­ten. And so we don’t show our true selves online, but a mask designed to con­form to the opin­ions of those around us.”
— Neil Strauss, Wall Street Journal

Learn more: The Narcissistic Principle: Why We Share on Social Media

💡 Subscribe and get a free ebook on how to get bet­ter PR ideas.

PR Resource: The Follower Contract

Spin Academy | Online PR Courses

The Follower Contract

How can brands bet­ter under­stand fol­low­er engage­ment? Think of every fol­low as an invis­ible contract.

Dear Brand,

  • Yes, I’m now fol­low­ing you. Congratulations (to you).
  • I fol­lowed you based on what you’ve demon­strated in the past, so don’t be sur­prised if I stop enga­ging (or unfol­low­ing) if you do oth­er stuff.
  • You now have my per­mis­sion to provide me with the type of con­tent that first attrac­ted me to your brand.
  • I, the fol­low­er, will determ­ine any involve­ment on a future case-by-case basis.
  • My fol­low is not a ‘pay­ment’ for your past accom­plish­ments; my fol­low is an ‘advance pay­ment’ for what I expect from you in the future.
  • It would be best if you always pre­sup­posed that I’m inter­ested in myself and my friends first and then, maybe, in your brand.
  • Until we part ways, I expect you to be clear about my poten­tial involve­ment in your cause.

Best regards,
Your New Follower

Think of every single fol­low­er, fan, and sub­scriber hav­ing such an agree­ment with your brand.

Read also: The Follower Contract

💡 Subscribe and get a free ebook on how to get bet­ter PR ideas.

PR Resource: Influencers in Public Relations

Influencers in Public Relations - Doctor Spin - The PR Blog
Influencers in pub­lic relations.
Spin Academy | Online PR Courses

The Influencers in Public Relations

In PR, influ­en­cers are indi­vidu­als who have man­aged to grow a sub­stan­tial audi­ence, which has the poten­tial to affect a spe­cif­ic organ­isa­tion either pos­it­ively or negatively.

Influencers in pub­lic rela­tions are emer­ging stake­hold­ers who gen­er­ate a state of opin­ion in the digit­al com­munity that sur­passes tra­di­tion­al pub­lic opin­ion.”
Source: The Role of Prosumers in the Interactive and Digital Processes of Public Relations 2Polo, M. (2020). The Role of Prosumers in the Interactive and Digital Processes of Public Relations. 161 – 174. https://​doi​.org/​1​0​.​4​0​1​8​/​978 – 1‑7998 – 3119‑8.ch012

Establishing and main­tain­ing good rela­tion­ships with stra­tegic­ally chosen influ­en­cers for the organ­isa­tion is often crit­ic­ally important.

I recom­mend using the fol­low­ing tiers and nam­ing con­ven­tions for cat­egor­ising dif­fer­ent types of influencers:

  • Nano influ­en­cer. Nano influ­en­cers are indi­vidu­als with a small yet engaged fol­low­ing, typ­ic­ally between 1,000 and 10,000 fol­low­ers (but this will vary based on both the plat­form and the niche), often focus­ing on niche interests and hav­ing a sol­id per­son­al con­nec­tion with their audience.
  • Micro influ­en­cer. Micro influ­en­cers have a mod­er­ately sized audi­ence, ran­ging from 10,000 to 50,000 fol­low­ers (but this will vary based on the plat­form and the niche). They are known for their expert­ise in spe­cif­ic fields or indus­tries, lead­ing to high­er engage­ment rates and a loy­al fanbase.
  • Macro influ­en­cer. Macro influ­en­cers pos­sess a more sig­ni­fic­ant fol­low­ing, usu­ally between 50,000 and 1 mil­lion fol­low­ers (but this will vary based on the plat­form and the niche). They have estab­lished them­selves as influ­en­tial fig­ures in their respect­ive fields, often col­lab­or­at­ing with brands for pro­mo­tions and partnerships.
  • Mega influ­en­cer. Mega influ­en­cers are high-pro­file indi­vidu­als with over 1 mil­lion fol­low­ers (but this will vary based on the plat­form and the niche), often includ­ing celebrit­ies and pub­lic fig­ures, who have a massive reach and can shape trends and drive con­sumer beha­viour on a large scale.

Learn more: The Influencers in Public Relations

💡 Subscribe and get a free ebook on how to get bet­ter PR ideas.

ANNOTATIONS
ANNOTATIONS
1 Perhaps “social media” isn’t the best name. Because why should­n’t a tele­phone be con­sidered a medi­um for dir­ect social inter­ac­tion? Early on, social media used to encom­pass search engines, blogs, and for­ums, but the scope of what the term includes has been nar­rowed down over time.
2 Polo, M. (2020). The Role of Prosumers in the Interactive and Digital Processes of Public Relations. 161 – 174. https://​doi​.org/​1​0​.​4​0​1​8​/​978 – 1‑7998 – 3119‑8.ch012
Jerry Silfwer
Jerry Silfwerhttps://doctorspin.net/
Jerry Silfwer, alias Doctor Spin, is an awarded senior adviser specialising in public relations and digital strategy. Currently CEO at Spin Factory and KIX Communication Index. Before that, he worked at Kaufmann, Whispr Group, Springtime PR, and Spotlight PR. Based in Stockholm, Sweden.

The Cover Photo

The cover photo isn't related to public relations; it's just a photo of mine. Think of it as a 'decorative diversion', a subtle reminder that there is more to life than strategic communication.

The cover photo has

.

Subscribe to Spin Control—it’s 100% free!

Join 2,550+ fellow PR lovers and subscribe to Jerry’s free newsletter on communication and psychology.
What will you get?

> PR commentary on current events.
> Subscriber-only VIP content.
> My personal PR slides for .key and .ppt.
> Discounts on upcoming PR courses.
> Ebook on getting better PR ideas.
Subscribe to Spin Control today by clicking SUBMIT and get your first send-out instantly.


🔒 Your email address is safe with me.

Latest Posts
Similar Posts
Most Popular