The PR BlogPR TrendsBusiness ShiftsWhy Future Superbrands Will Be Virtual Town Squares

Why Future Superbrands Will Be Virtual Town Squares

The future for brands might be both social and virtual.

Cover photo by Jerry Silfwer (Instagram)

Will there be superbrands also in the future?

Will we see “Facebooks”, “Amazons”, “Apples”, or “Googles” in a future where the total brand experience will be more personal and digital than ever before?

The scope of the horizontal conversations and the speed of group formation are unprecedented in human history. Everything becomes individualized, personalized, diversified, distributed, and disrupted.

At the same time, we look upon the giants. Honestly, do we see Apple or Google participating in the online conversation? Well, we don’t.

One might argue that conversational marketing is nothing but cosmetics, and when push comes to shove, it’s all about the products and the services provided.

Others might argue that these supernova brands don’t have to state their case – their ambassadors are doing it for them.

I would argue that it comes naturally for us humans to state our independence and uniqueness as individuals, but when it comes to our everyday lives and day-to-day existence, we’re just creatures of habit.

Google is a fantastic company and superbrand, but what would they be without the millions of people using their search engine? Every innovation and long-tail line extension of the Google brand is part of a continuous forward motion, mainly because it reinforces our habitual usage.

Tell me, how often do you google something?

You and I and everyone – we are creatures of habit, mainly so since not everything can be a rational decision. And that’s also why we’ll have superbrands in the future. They might not be participating in the conversation because of the Cluetrain Manifesto. Instead, they provide arenas, digital habitats, for talks between online citizens.

Or put another way: Our mental bandwidth has a limit, so there will still be a small number of brands we can relate to.

Future superbrands will gain and maintain such privileged positions by transforming into virtual town squares.

Jerry Silfwer
Jerry Silfwerhttps://www.doctorspin.net/
Jerry Silfwer, alias Doctor Spin, is an awarded senior adviser specialising in public relations and digital strategy. Currently CEO at KIX Index and Spin Factory. Before that, he worked at Kaufmann, Whispr Group, Springtime PR, and Spotlight PR. Based in Stockholm, Sweden.

5 COMMENTS

  1. Personalization, habits and big corporations: what a current picture (even if you wrote about 2 years ago)!
    I agree with you, Jerry. Firstly, while we are creating huge and various networks between all of us, where thoughts and actions took place from the bottom, we have to consider how time consuming is this social networking activity. It’s enreaching our minds, definitly, but to what extent is our capability to keep an eye on everyting (the bandwith)? Someone else talked about “distraction” (https://joekraus.com/were-creating-a-culture-of-distraction?utm_source=pulsenews&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+mediaredef+%28jason+hirschhorn%27s+Media+ReDEFined%29).
    Secondly, there is the convergence process defining the current rules within the most industries, internet and ICT too (Google, MS, Apple, big corporations like Nokia, Samsung, and so on are currently moving on that way), as well as bigger market shares are driving corporate strategies and M&A: that means superbrands.
    So, I think that big corporations have the assets (people and technologies) to lead personalization and one2one services to keep our life easier in the midst of “distraction”. If so, we will feel more confident with well known brands, big brands. And habits will still have a big role in our daily life. Or maybe I’m wrong.

    • Yeah, I must say I’m quite into behavioural marketing still. Both from an “understanding habit” perspective, but also when it comes to creating the necessary conditions for habits to form. I’m constantly amazed by how few sites and services we actually frequent and what they all have in common is how well they incentivise habitual behaviour.

      And thanks for stopping by to drop comments Stefano, you should know that I appreciate it!

  2. Personalization, habits and big corporations: what a current picture (even if you wrote about 2 years ago)!
    I agree with you, Jerry. Firstly, while we are creating huge and various networks between all of us, where thoughts and actions took place from the bottom, we have to consider how time consuming is this social networking activity. It’s enreaching our minds, definitely, but to what extent is our capability to keep an eye on everyting (the bandwith)? Someone else talked about “distraction” (https://joekraus.com/were-creating-a-culture-of-distraction?utm_source=pulsenews&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+mediaredef+%28jason+hirschhorn%27s+Media+ReDEFined%29).
    Secondly, there is the convergence process defining the current rules within the most industries, internet and ICT too (Google, MS, Apple, Nokia, Samsung, and so on are currently moving on that way), as well as bigger market shares are driving corporate strategies and M&A: that means superbrands.
    So, I think that big corporations have the assets (people and technologies) to lead personalization and one2one services to keep our life easier in the midst of “distraction”. If so, we will feel more confident with well known brands, big brands. And habits will still have a big role in our daily life. Or maybe I’m wrong.

  3. Personalization, habits and big corporations: what a current picture (even if you wrote about 2 years ago)!
    I agree with you, Jerry. Firstly, while we are creating huge and various networks between all of us, where thoughts and actions took place from the bottom, we have to consider how time consuming is this social networking activity. It’s enreaching our minds, definitly, but to what extent is our capability to keep an eye on everyting (the bandwith)? Someone else talked about “distraction” (https://joekraus.com/were-creating-a-culture-of-distraction?utm_source=pulsenews&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+mediaredef+%28jason+hirschhorn%27s+Media+ReDEFined%29).
    Secondly, there is the convergence process defining the current rules within the most industries, internet and ICT too (Google, MS, Apple, big corporations like Nokia, Samsung, and so on are currently moving on that way), as well as bigger market shares are driving corporate strategies and M&A: that means superbrands.
    So, I think that big corporations have the assets (people and technologies) to lead personalization and one2one services to keep our life easier in the midst of “distraction”. If so, we will feel more confident with well known brands, big brands. And habits will still have a big role in our daily life. Or maybe I’m wrong.

    • Yeah, I must say I’m quite into behavioural marketing still. Both from an “understanding habit” perspective, but also when it comes to creating the necessary conditions for habits to form. I’m constantly amazed by how few sites and services we actually frequent and what they all have in common is how well they incentivise habitual behaviour.

      And thanks for stopping by to drop comments Stefano, you should know that I appreciate it!

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