OPA (Other People’s Audiences)

The piggybacking PR strategy.

Cover photo: @jerrysilfwer

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OPA (oth­er people’s audi­ences) is the fast­est way to grow.

So, you have no audi­ence. Well, that’s the way every brand has to start. Building an audi­ence isn’t easy, and there are no guar­an­tees of success.

However, there’s a way to grow your audi­ence — fast.
And with little cost.

You piggy­back on oth­er people’s audi­ences.

Let’s dive right in:

OPA — Too Good To Be True?

Typically, you build an audi­ence slowly and stead­ily. You struggle to reach new people, and then you work to estab­lish enough trust for people to stick around.

It’s a mutu­al under­stand­ing — a Follower Contract.

But what if your inbound growth is too slow?
And your mar­ket­ing budget is weak?

You could design a clev­er vir­al loop. Still, vir­al loops are typ­ic­ally devel­op­ment-heavy and keep­ing them “alive” is extremely dif­fi­cult — if you can even get them to work in the first place.

But get­ting your­self and your brand in front of oth­er people’s audi­ences is a sure­fire way to accel­er­ate your growth. If you man­age to col­lab­or­ate wisely, your brand audi­ence could grow exponentially.

It sounds almost too good to be true.

However, it’s true and tested. The only caveat is that you must have some­thing of value to trade.

Incentive Mapping for OPA

These are my best tips to get your­self and your brand in front of OPA (oth­er people’s audi­ences): 1I recom­mend Copyblogger’s excel­lent blog art­icle, The Smart Way to Use Other People’s Audiences to Build Your Own.

1. Give OPAs Exclusivity

Your brand might have access to exclus­ive reports, con­tent, news, launch details, etc.

2. Give OPAs Traffic

Your brand might have at least some online traffic of interest for the plat­form own­er to bene­fit from.

3. Give OPAs SEO Boosts

Your brand might offer do-fol­low links and social media men­tions of value for the plat­form owner.

4. Give OPAs Well-Deserved Praise

Your brand might be able to hon­our the plat­form own­er with a rel­ev­ant reward, like an hon­or­ary title.

5. Give OPAs Extra Clout

Your brand might be posi­tioned to elev­ate the plat­form own­er (“king­maker”) to a high­er status.

6. Give OPAs Valuable Insight

Your brand might offer the plat­form own­er­’s audi­ence expert know­ledge of value.

7. Give OPAs Some Excitement

Your brand might offer excit­ing value exper­i­ences to the plat­form own­er­’s audience.

8. Give OPAs Lots of Entertainment

Your brand might be able to offer com­pel­ling stor­ies or oth­er types of enter­tain­ing content.

9. Give OPAs Useful Inspiration

Your brand might be in a pos­i­tion to offer inspiration.

10. Give OPAs Your Services

Your brand might be able to offer products or ser­vices for free.

The No. 1 Strategy for OPA

While the above Incentive Mapping is help­ful, there’s one OPA strategy that out­shines them all:

Become an influ­en­cer with an audi­ence yourself.

It’s a chick­en-or-the-egg situ­ation, of course, but it’ll be easi­er to piggy­back on oth­er people’s audi­ences as your audi­ence grows.

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Thanks for read­ing. Please sup­port my blog by shar­ing art­icles with oth­er com­mu­nic­a­tions and mar­ket­ing pro­fes­sion­als. You might also con­sider my PR ser­vices or speak­ing engage­ments.

PR Resource: Influencer Marketing vs Influencer Relations

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Influencer Marketing vs Influencer Relations

There are two main types of influ­en­cer mar­ket­ing and two main types of influ­en­cer relations:

Influencer Marketing

Influencer advert­ising = the influ­en­cer will pub­lish the brand’s pre-made con­tent in their channels.

Influencer spon­sor­ship = the influ­en­cer will read a script to con­vey an offer­ing fol­low­ing the brand’s instructions.

Influencer Relations

Influencer col­lab­or­a­tion = the influ­en­cer show­cases the brand’s offer­ing by cre­at­ing con­tent sim­il­ar to the influ­en­cer­’s reg­u­lar content.

Influencer out­reach = the influ­en­cer receives invit­a­tions, demos, or exclus­ive mater­i­al without strings attached.

Advertising and spon­sor­ships are what we typ­ic­ally refer to as influ­en­cer mar­ket­ing. Collaborations and out­reach are typ­ic­ally referred to as influ­en­cer rela­tions.

Organisations look­ing to util­ise the poten­tial reach of rel­ev­ant influ­en­cers will be wise to pay atten­tion to these dis­tinc­tions. 2Silfwer, J. (2020, January 15). The Influencers in Public Relations. Doctor Spin | The PR Blog. https://​doc​tor​spin​.net/​i​n​f​l​u​e​n​c​e​r​s​-​i​n​-​p​u​b​l​i​c​-​r​e​l​a​t​i​o​ns/

Learn more: Influencer Relations Is Not Influencer Marketing

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PR Resource: How To Categorise Influencers

Influencers in Public Relations - Doctor Spin - The PR Blog
Influencers in pub­lic relations.
Spin Academy | Online PR Courses

The Influencers in Public Relations

In PR, influ­en­cers are indi­vidu­als who have man­aged to grow a sub­stan­tial audi­ence, which has the poten­tial to affect a spe­cif­ic organ­isa­tion either pos­it­ively or negatively.

Influencers = inde­pend­ent con­tent cre­at­ors with influ­en­tial plat­forms and fol­low­ers of import­ance to the organ­isa­tion. 3Silfwer, J. (2020, January 15). The Influencers in Public Relations. Doctor Spin | The PR Blog. https://​doc​tor​spin​.net/​i​n​f​l​u​e​n​c​e​r​s​-​i​n​-​p​u​b​l​i​c​-​r​e​l​a​t​i​o​ns/

Establishing and main­tain­ing good rela­tion­ships with stra­tegic­ally chosen influ­en­cers for the organ­isa­tion is often crit­ic­ally important.

Influencers in pub­lic rela­tions are emer­ging stake­hold­ers who gen­er­ate a state of opin­ion in the digit­al com­munity that sur­passes tra­di­tion­al pub­lic opin­ion.”
Source: The Role of Prosumers in the Interactive and Digital Processes of Public Relations 4Polo, M. (2020). The Role of Prosumers in the Interactive and Digital Processes of Public Relations. 161 – 174. https://​doi​.org/​1​0​.​4​0​1​8​/​978 – 1‑7998 – 3119‑8.ch012

How To Categorise Influencers

I recom­mend using the fol­low­ing tiers and nam­ing con­ven­tions for cat­egor­ising dif­fer­ent types of influencers:

  • Nano influ­en­cer. Nano influ­en­cers are indi­vidu­als with a small yet engaged fol­low­ing, typ­ic­ally between 1,000 and 10,000 fol­low­ers (but this will vary based on both the plat­form and the niche). They often focus on niche interests and have a sol­id per­son­al con­nec­tion with their audience.
  • Micro influ­en­cer. Micro influ­en­cers have a mod­er­ately sized audi­ence, ran­ging from 10,000 to 50,000 fol­low­ers (but this will vary based on the plat­form and the niche). They are known for their expert­ise in spe­cif­ic fields or indus­tries, lead­ing to high­er engage­ment rates and a loy­al fanbase.
  • Macro influ­en­cer. Macro influ­en­cers pos­sess a more sig­ni­fic­ant fol­low­ing, usu­ally between 50,000 and 1 mil­lion fol­low­ers (but this will vary based on the plat­form and the niche). They have estab­lished them­selves as influ­en­tial fig­ures in their respect­ive fields, often col­lab­or­at­ing with brands for pro­mo­tions and partnerships.
  • Mega influ­en­cer. Mega influ­en­cers are high-pro­file indi­vidu­als with over 1 mil­lion fol­low­ers (but this will vary based on the plat­form and the niche), often includ­ing celebrit­ies and pub­lic fig­ures, who have a massive reach and can shape trends and drive con­sumer beha­viour on a large scale.

Learn more: The Influencers in Public Relations

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PR Resource: Six Principles of Influence

Influence-New-and-Cialdini-Expanded-The-Psychology-of-Persuasion
“Influence” by Robert B. Cialdini.

Influence” by Robert B. Cialdini

Robert B. Cialdini pub­lished “Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion” in 1984, and his prin­ciples of influ­ence are widely cited. They provide a frame­work for under­stand­ing how people are per­suaded, and pub­lic rela­tions, advert­ising, and sales pro­fes­sion­als often use them. 5Cialdini, R. B. (2009). Influence: The psy­cho­logy of per­sua­sion (Rev. ed.). HarperCollins.

Here are Cialdini’s six principles:

  • Reciprocity. This prin­ciple is based on the idea that people feel oblig­ated to give back when they receive it. If a com­pany gives some­thing to its cus­tom­ers (like a free sample or a dis­count), those cus­tom­ers may feel com­pelled to pur­chase in return.
  • Scarcity. People tend to want things that are lim­ited or hard to get. Marketers often use this prin­ciple by cre­at­ing a sense of urgency around a product or ser­vice, such as a lim­ited-time offer or a lim­ited-edi­tion product.
  • Authority. People tend to fol­low the lead of cred­ible experts. In PR and mar­ket­ing, this can be achieved by hav­ing an expert endorse a product or demon­strate expert­ise and cred­ib­il­ity in the field.
  • Consistency (or Commitment). People like to be con­sist­ent with the things they have pre­vi­ously said or done. This prin­ciple is often used in mar­ket­ing by get­ting a small ini­tial com­mit­ment from a cus­tom­er, which increases the like­li­hood that they will make a more sig­ni­fic­ant com­mit­ment later.
  • Liking. People are more likely to be per­suaded by people they like. Physical attract­ive­ness, sim­il­ar­ity, com­pli­ments, and coöper­a­tion can influ­ence this.
  • Consensus (or Social Proof). People often look to the actions and beha­viours of oth­ers to determ­ine their own. If a product or ser­vice is pop­u­lar or endorsed by oth­ers, people are like­li­er to deem it good or trustworthy.

These prin­ciples are power­ful tools for per­sua­sion and can be used indi­vidu­ally or in com­bin­a­tion to influ­ence per­cep­tions and behaviours.

Learn more: Public Relations Books

ANNOTATIONS
ANNOTATIONS
1 I recom­mend Copyblogger’s excel­lent blog art­icle, The Smart Way to Use Other People’s Audiences to Build Your Own.
2 Silfwer, J. (2020, January 15). The Influencers in Public Relations. Doctor Spin | The PR Blog. https://​doc​tor​spin​.net/​i​n​f​l​u​e​n​c​e​r​s​-​i​n​-​p​u​b​l​i​c​-​r​e​l​a​t​i​o​ns/
3 Silfwer, J. (2020, January 15). The Influencers in Public Relations. Doctor Spin | The PR Blog. https://​doc​tor​spin​.net/​i​n​f​l​u​e​n​c​e​r​s​-​i​n​-​p​u​b​l​i​c​-​r​e​l​a​t​i​o​ns/
4 Polo, M. (2020). The Role of Prosumers in the Interactive and Digital Processes of Public Relations. 161 – 174. https://​doi​.org/​1​0​.​4​0​1​8​/​978 – 1‑7998 – 3119‑8.ch012
5 Cialdini, R. B. (2009). Influence: The psy­cho­logy of per­sua­sion (Rev. ed.). HarperCollins.
Jerry Silfwer
Jerry Silfwerhttps://doctorspin.net/
Jerry Silfwer, alias Doctor Spin, is an awarded senior adviser specialising in public relations and digital strategy. Currently CEO at Spin Factory and KIX Communication Index. Before that, he worked at Kaufmann, Whispr Group, Springtime PR, and Spotlight PR. Based in Stockholm, Sweden.
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The Cover Photo

The cover photo isn't related to public relations; it's just a photo of mine. Think of it as a 'decorative diversion', a subtle reminder that there is more to life than strategic communication.

The cover photo has

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